Blessed are the dissonant

Couple of good items on Dissonant Bible.

Eleventh Hour Gospel asks what sort of worker would still be left in the marketplace at the end of the day (“the unfit? the weak? those with an obvious disability? … or with a criminal record? … those who look like foreigners?”).

And then a quote from Conrad Gempf, in which Gempf describes a biblical principle that is “very simple but very neglected”:

“[Y]ou shouldn’t focus on those passages in the Bible that contain answers you resonate with. Instead, focus on passages that address situations that resonate with your situation. So it’s not, “Are there any biblical characters who received the kind of message I want to hear? but rather, “What does the Bible say to characters who are in a similar situation to my own?”

This is particularly true when we read texts such as the Beatitudes (“Wake up, gang. We are not the meek. We rarely know what it means to hunger and thirst”) or those to do with worldly wealth:

For instance, too many rich people name and claim promises like “God will provide”. Instead, maybe we should make little religious knick-knack vases with dried flowers in them and “Woe to the rich” embossed in gold letters. Yes, Jesus loves us all dearly, but we’re told he disciplines those whom he loves (Prov. 3:12; Heb. 12:6). Where are the t-shirts with the motto “Jesus had stern words for people like me?”

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12 Responses to Blessed are the dissonant

  1. Theresa K. says:

    Oh my, I definitely need that T-shirt. I may even let my teens borrow it occasionally. πŸ˜‰ Amen to this post!

  2. Theresa K. says:

    Oh my, I definitely need that T-shirt. I may even let my teens borrow it occasionally. πŸ˜‰ Amen to this post!

  3. Theresa K. says:

    Oh my, I definitely need that T-shirt. I may even let my teens borrow it occasionally. πŸ˜‰ Amen to this post!

  4. Theresa K. says:

    Oh my, I definitely need that T-shirt. I may even let my teens borrow it occasionally. πŸ˜‰ Amen to this post!

  5. CPA says:

    Maybe there are no workers at the end of the day, because they were blown up by a car bomb:
    The violence appeared to be retaliation for the weeklong siege of the insurgent stronghold of Tal Afar and included a bombing in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad that used a new tactic: luring scores of day laborers to a minivan with promises of work, and then blowing it up. At least 112 died in that blast alone, the second highest death toll from any single terrorist bombing in Iraq since the invasion.
    . . .
    [This] worst attack singled out workers in a Shiite neighborhood, Kadhimiya, with an explosion that tore through a crowded intersection, leaving the facades of nearby shops shattered and puddles of blood on the streets.
    “I saw a huge fireball in the air, and I felt the heat and flame on my face,” said Kadhum Nasir Malih, 28, a laborer who lives in a hotel near the site of the blast. “I went outside the hotel, and I was amazed to see the number of bodies. Some were still, and some were groaning with agony, charred and covered with blood, with smoke rising from them.”
    . . .
    “There were bodies everywhere, I was lucky to have survived,” said Saadi Hussein Ali, a 55 year-old laborer whose arm was broken in the Kadhimiya bombing, as he lay exhausted on a hospital cot. “It was only workers – why would they want to kill us? We are poor.”

    From the NYTimes here

  6. CPA says:

    Maybe there are no workers at the end of the day, because they were blown up by a car bomb:
    The violence appeared to be retaliation for the weeklong siege of the insurgent stronghold of Tal Afar and included a bombing in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad that used a new tactic: luring scores of day laborers to a minivan with promises of work, and then blowing it up. At least 112 died in that blast alone, the second highest death toll from any single terrorist bombing in Iraq since the invasion.
    . . .
    [This] worst attack singled out workers in a Shiite neighborhood, Kadhimiya, with an explosion that tore through a crowded intersection, leaving the facades of nearby shops shattered and puddles of blood on the streets.
    “I saw a huge fireball in the air, and I felt the heat and flame on my face,” said Kadhum Nasir Malih, 28, a laborer who lives in a hotel near the site of the blast. “I went outside the hotel, and I was amazed to see the number of bodies. Some were still, and some were groaning with agony, charred and covered with blood, with smoke rising from them.”
    . . .
    “There were bodies everywhere, I was lucky to have survived,” said Saadi Hussein Ali, a 55 year-old laborer whose arm was broken in the Kadhimiya bombing, as he lay exhausted on a hospital cot. “It was only workers – why would they want to kill us? We are poor.”

    From the NYTimes here

  7. CPA says:

    Maybe there are no workers at the end of the day, because they were blown up by a car bomb:
    The violence appeared to be retaliation for the weeklong siege of the insurgent stronghold of Tal Afar and included a bombing in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad that used a new tactic: luring scores of day laborers to a minivan with promises of work, and then blowing it up. At least 112 died in that blast alone, the second highest death toll from any single terrorist bombing in Iraq since the invasion.
    . . .
    [This] worst attack singled out workers in a Shiite neighborhood, Kadhimiya, with an explosion that tore through a crowded intersection, leaving the facades of nearby shops shattered and puddles of blood on the streets.
    “I saw a huge fireball in the air, and I felt the heat and flame on my face,” said Kadhum Nasir Malih, 28, a laborer who lives in a hotel near the site of the blast. “I went outside the hotel, and I was amazed to see the number of bodies. Some were still, and some were groaning with agony, charred and covered with blood, with smoke rising from them.”
    . . .
    “There were bodies everywhere, I was lucky to have survived,” said Saadi Hussein Ali, a 55 year-old laborer whose arm was broken in the Kadhimiya bombing, as he lay exhausted on a hospital cot. “It was only workers – why would they want to kill us? We are poor.”

    From the NYTimes here

  8. CPA says:

    Maybe there are no workers at the end of the day, because they were blown up by a car bomb:
    The violence appeared to be retaliation for the weeklong siege of the insurgent stronghold of Tal Afar and included a bombing in a Shiite neighborhood of Baghdad that used a new tactic: luring scores of day laborers to a minivan with promises of work, and then blowing it up. At least 112 died in that blast alone, the second highest death toll from any single terrorist bombing in Iraq since the invasion.
    . . .
    [This] worst attack singled out workers in a Shiite neighborhood, Kadhimiya, with an explosion that tore through a crowded intersection, leaving the facades of nearby shops shattered and puddles of blood on the streets.
    “I saw a huge fireball in the air, and I felt the heat and flame on my face,” said Kadhum Nasir Malih, 28, a laborer who lives in a hotel near the site of the blast. “I went outside the hotel, and I was amazed to see the number of bodies. Some were still, and some were groaning with agony, charred and covered with blood, with smoke rising from them.”
    . . .
    “There were bodies everywhere, I was lucky to have survived,” said Saadi Hussein Ali, a 55 year-old laborer whose arm was broken in the Kadhimiya bombing, as he lay exhausted on a hospital cot. “It was only workers – why would they want to kill us? We are poor.”

    From the NYTimes here

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