Tracks in the snow of the world

Wonderful poem, from Gordon Brown’s eulogy for Robin Cook, yesterday:

Praise of a Man

The beneficent lights dim
but don’t vanish.
The razory edges
dull, but still cut.
He’s gone:
but you can see
his tracks still, in the snow of the world.

                                              – Norman McCaig

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24 Responses to Tracks in the snow of the world

  1. Rick Ritchie says:

    I’m glad I clicked on the link. I was afraid this death meant no more medical thrillers.
    But sorry if you lost a good guy.

  2. Rick Ritchie says:

    I’m glad I clicked on the link. I was afraid this death meant no more medical thrillers.
    But sorry if you lost a good guy.

  3. Rick Ritchie says:

    I’m glad I clicked on the link. I was afraid this death meant no more medical thrillers.
    But sorry if you lost a good guy.

  4. Rick Ritchie says:

    I’m glad I clicked on the link. I was afraid this death meant no more medical thrillers.
    But sorry if you lost a good guy.

  5. Nick Jones says:

    Thanks for the link, John. A magnificent speech, and a fantastic piece of propaganda for the apotheosis of Gordon.

  6. Nick Jones says:

    Thanks for the link, John. A magnificent speech, and a fantastic piece of propaganda for the apotheosis of Gordon.

  7. Nick Jones says:

    Thanks for the link, John. A magnificent speech, and a fantastic piece of propaganda for the apotheosis of Gordon.

  8. Nick Jones says:

    Thanks for the link, John. A magnificent speech, and a fantastic piece of propaganda for the apotheosis of Gordon.

  9. Nick Jones says:

    Sorry, ı appear to have flushed before I quite finished my motion. To continue on a more elevated plane, I particularly enjoyed this:’In the six days since he was taken from us, Tony Blair, John Prescott, all who have spoken or written from all political persuasions and none’. I suppose Tony falls into the ‘ political persuasions category’. In fact, if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works . Bliss

  10. Nick Jones says:

    Sorry, ı appear to have flushed before I quite finished my motion. To continue on a more elevated plane, I particularly enjoyed this:’In the six days since he was taken from us, Tony Blair, John Prescott, all who have spoken or written from all political persuasions and none’. I suppose Tony falls into the ‘ political persuasions category’. In fact, if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works . Bliss

  11. Nick Jones says:

    Sorry, ı appear to have flushed before I quite finished my motion. To continue on a more elevated plane, I particularly enjoyed this:’In the six days since he was taken from us, Tony Blair, John Prescott, all who have spoken or written from all political persuasions and none’. I suppose Tony falls into the ‘ political persuasions category’. In fact, if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works . Bliss

  12. Nick Jones says:

    Sorry, ı appear to have flushed before I quite finished my motion. To continue on a more elevated plane, I particularly enjoyed this:’In the six days since he was taken from us, Tony Blair, John Prescott, all who have spoken or written from all political persuasions and none’. I suppose Tony falls into the ‘ political persuasions category’. In fact, if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works . Bliss

  13. John H says:

    …if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works…
    And if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as yet another calculated attempt to make those on the Left of the Labour Party think he is repudiating Blair and all his works, but without actually doing so in so many words. (Not surprising given that the works are as much Brown’s as Blair’s, at least on the home front.)

  14. John H says:

    …if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works…
    And if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as yet another calculated attempt to make those on the Left of the Labour Party think he is repudiating Blair and all his works, but without actually doing so in so many words. (Not surprising given that the works are as much Brown’s as Blair’s, at least on the home front.)

  15. John H says:

    …if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works…
    And if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as yet another calculated attempt to make those on the Left of the Labour Party think he is repudiating Blair and all his works, but without actually doing so in so many words. (Not surprising given that the works are as much Brown’s as Blair’s, at least on the home front.)

  16. John H says:

    …if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as a calculated repudiation of Blair and all his works…
    And if you were so persuaded, you could read the whole speech as yet another calculated attempt to make those on the Left of the Labour Party think he is repudiating Blair and all his works, but without actually doing so in so many words. (Not surprising given that the works are as much Brown’s as Blair’s, at least on the home front.)

  17. Nick Jones says:

    Yes, of course you are quite right, but let me indulge my illusions of sunnier times at home in New Britain from my perch on the South-Eastern edge of Europe; who’d want to break the day-dream of an ex-labour ex-pat?

  18. Nick Jones says:

    Yes, of course you are quite right, but let me indulge my illusions of sunnier times at home in New Britain from my perch on the South-Eastern edge of Europe; who’d want to break the day-dream of an ex-labour ex-pat?

  19. Nick Jones says:

    Yes, of course you are quite right, but let me indulge my illusions of sunnier times at home in New Britain from my perch on the South-Eastern edge of Europe; who’d want to break the day-dream of an ex-labour ex-pat?

  20. Nick Jones says:

    Yes, of course you are quite right, but let me indulge my illusions of sunnier times at home in New Britain from my perch on the South-Eastern edge of Europe; who’d want to break the day-dream of an ex-labour ex-pat?

  21. John H says:

    Sorry to disillusion you. 😉
    Talking of Our Gordon, I’m reading Tony Benn’s 1991-2001 diaries (see, there’s hope for me yet), and he’s very rude about Gordon Brown in his 1992/1993 entries. “I wouldn’t employ him as a research assistant” is one phrase that springs to mind. And Benn definitely regards Brown as a right-winger.
    I suppose the difference between Brown and Blair is that Brown is at least more of a Labour figure, along the lines perhaps of someone like Roy Hattersley, who gets described as a left-winger these days, simply because he comes from the old-fashioned “right-wing” Labour tradition, which compared with Tony Blair now looks like Trotskyism.

  22. John H says:

    Sorry to disillusion you. 😉
    Talking of Our Gordon, I’m reading Tony Benn’s 1991-2001 diaries (see, there’s hope for me yet), and he’s very rude about Gordon Brown in his 1992/1993 entries. “I wouldn’t employ him as a research assistant” is one phrase that springs to mind. And Benn definitely regards Brown as a right-winger.
    I suppose the difference between Brown and Blair is that Brown is at least more of a Labour figure, along the lines perhaps of someone like Roy Hattersley, who gets described as a left-winger these days, simply because he comes from the old-fashioned “right-wing” Labour tradition, which compared with Tony Blair now looks like Trotskyism.

  23. John H says:

    Sorry to disillusion you. 😉
    Talking of Our Gordon, I’m reading Tony Benn’s 1991-2001 diaries (see, there’s hope for me yet), and he’s very rude about Gordon Brown in his 1992/1993 entries. “I wouldn’t employ him as a research assistant” is one phrase that springs to mind. And Benn definitely regards Brown as a right-winger.
    I suppose the difference between Brown and Blair is that Brown is at least more of a Labour figure, along the lines perhaps of someone like Roy Hattersley, who gets described as a left-winger these days, simply because he comes from the old-fashioned “right-wing” Labour tradition, which compared with Tony Blair now looks like Trotskyism.

  24. John H says:

    Sorry to disillusion you. 😉
    Talking of Our Gordon, I’m reading Tony Benn’s 1991-2001 diaries (see, there’s hope for me yet), and he’s very rude about Gordon Brown in his 1992/1993 entries. “I wouldn’t employ him as a research assistant” is one phrase that springs to mind. And Benn definitely regards Brown as a right-winger.
    I suppose the difference between Brown and Blair is that Brown is at least more of a Labour figure, along the lines perhaps of someone like Roy Hattersley, who gets described as a left-winger these days, simply because he comes from the old-fashioned “right-wing” Labour tradition, which compared with Tony Blair now looks like Trotskyism.

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